Arcadia was the second of two “historical” designs for this course, and our final design of the semester.  The play afforded me the opportunity to explore three period styles:  modern, regency, and “costume” regency.  Color palette aided in the definition of  character and relationships, as is common, however silhouette spoke louder for character development.  Thomasina’s evolution from an inquisitive child to an enchanting young woman is a key example of this; her bonnet and doll-like clothes, trimmed in lace and fancy, give way to sheer sleeves, deeper necklines, and an air much closer to that of her mother, Lady Croom.  The final scene of the play bridges the chasm of time between then and now, with modern characters showcasing regency era costumes, and regency characters appearing along side them.  With the modern “costumes” it was necessary to create a shadow of what regency clothing really was, a fallibility in the silhouette.  This is best exhibited by the characters Gus and Augustus.  Gus is of the modern period and Augustus of the regency period, however, the two are played by the same actor.  Gus’s regency costume is stiff, the pants too casual, the coat too generic, while Augustus silhouette is more sincere to the research of the time. 
Research to be added soon.
Thomasina
Thomasina
Lady Croom
Augustus
Gus
Gus
Hannah
Hannah
Valentine
Chloe
 
 
Arcadia

Theoretical Costume Design

Director:  David Reed

 
 
Metamorphoses

Theoretical Costume Design

Director:  David Jortner

The freedom with which Zimmerman interpreted the classic mythos presented in Metamorphoses and the post-modern influences on the writing allowed for great freedom in design and rendering style.  My director in particular urged me to looked toward cubism, a challenge for a designer who attempts to convey ease in construction by thorough detail.  A more disjointed script in terms of story, each character was examined as a “type,” a recognizable persona and elaborated upon.  The laundresses washing in the pool, brought images of O Brother Where Art Thou?’s sirens.  Zeus appeared as a master chess player.  Two of my favorite challenges from this production were the designing of Baucis and Alcyone.  Baucis would visually need to turn into a tree on stage, and it was the director’s hope that this could be achieved on stage.  By research I came across a form of aerosol fabric, whose texture arguably mimicked moss and which could be applied on stage.  With the addition of stilt-based “trunks,” a visually compelling scene could theoretically be achieved.  Alcyone would also transform, but into a bird.  The use of fabric as wings and the construction of Alcyone’s garment to properly transform was key to creating a proper metamorphoses. 
Research to be added soon.
Laundresses
Zeus
Baucis
Midas's Daughter
Hunger
Alcyone
Narcissus
Eurydice
 
 
A Streetcar Named Desire

Theoretical Costume Design

Director:  Stan Denman

 
Streetcar was the first of two “historical” designs for this course.  A classic with countless of variations in designs across the years, fragility and heat were focuses of our production.  The languishing of Blanche as the southern flower in the blistering heat of New Orleans influenced much of her silhouette, from her smooth, flowing wrap dress, to her crushed and wilted gown in the climax.  Similarly the heat influenced the menswear as well; Stanley, a hot-blooded man, bears a open shirt, athletic-shirt bared.  Stella, the doll in Blanches eye, wear a sweet maternity dress, ideal for hiding her pregnancy in the earlier moments of the plot.  The gentleman caller, the young boy, is everything the fanatical Blanche should want to see in a young attractive man:  buttoned-up with youth and charm and a bow on top. 
Research to be added soon.
Blanche
Stella
Stanley
Blanche
Young Gentleman Caller
 
 
A Servant of Two Masters

Theoretical Costume Design

Director:  Jessi (Hampton) House

 
The playfulness of this translation of A Servant of Two Masters led us down the road of a traveling children's show, particularly a traveling children's show with no budget.
Costumes would need to follow the silhouettes exhibited in Commedia d'el Arte and be recognizable tropes to younger audiences, but would also need to be built from pieces arguably found in stock or at a Goodwill/Salvation Army.  For further elaboration on the stock of each look, please click on the slides to the left.
Research to be added soon.
Pantalone
Smeraldina
Truffaldino
Beatrice

 

© 2020 by VICTORIA NICOLETTE GIST. 
 

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